All Water Guides

Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide Service in Central Texas

2016 Orvis Guide of the Year Finalist

2015 Orvis Guide Service of the Year Finalist

Filtering by Tag: Guadalupe River

Don't be an April Fool, Get out on the Water Soon

Spring is here in central Texas! While the weather can still be unpredictable, for the most part the cold days are behind us. Texas cold that is. As the days get longer and the temperatures start to climb into the 80s everything starts to get a lot more frisky. Especially the fish in our local waters. Fishing on the Colorado River has been good for a while. White Bass, freshwater drum, Guadalupe Bass, Largemouth Bass, and even a few Buffalo have all been caught on the Colorado in the last couple of weeks. A few folks have been lucky enough to catch some bass on top. As the water temperatures continue to rise topwater fishing will turn on more.

Because of the higher flows this winter on the Guadalupe River, trout fishing continues to be good. Fishing should continue for at least the next few weeks. Early morning half day trips will be the best bet as temperature rise. Trout fishing will start to tail off as the recreational (tubing) traffic increases. All in all this year has been one of the best seasons on the Guadalupe in years.

Coastal fishing can be pretty awesome this time of year as well. The spring is known for windy days down on the coast, but if you are flexible with your fishing days you can have an amazing time in the salt in the spring. Redfish get pretty frisky when the water starts to warm in the spring. Just keep an eye on the weather and be ready when the wind dies down.

So now that you know what’s going on out there, grab your gear and hit the water. No April fooling around here. Spring in Texas is the real deal.

looking Good For 2019

2019 is off to a good start. Trout fishing on the Guadalupe River has been great. Although higher flows have made wade fishing pretty tough , float fishing has been good, and the trout really do much better with more water in the river. An additional benefit of the higher flows is a longer season. Trout fishing on the Guadalupe should be good well into the spring this year.

Bass fishing is usually slow this time of year but we have still been having some luck on the warmer days. Good flows on the San Marcos and Llano Rivers should give us some great bass fishing once things warm up a bit. The Colorado River has been high all winter, but with dropping lake levels the flows should return to normal in the coming weeks. Most of the largest Guadalupe and Largemouth bass are caught during the late winter and early spring on the Colorado River.

Higher winter flows on our local rivers mean good runs of white bass in the late winter and early spring. The Llano, Pedernales, San Gabriel, and the upper Colorado should all be good this year. White bass runs on the lower Colorado have been getting more consistent as well.

Winter is here!

 

Winter in central Texas is never a dull time of year. Monday's high can be in the 20s and it can be in the 70s by the weekend. Our fishing this time of year can be just as varied. Here are a few options for winter fishing in central Texas.

Guadalupe River trout fishing. The Guadalupe River is the southernmost trout stream in the lower 48. The Guadalupe River chapter of Trout Unlimited (GRTU) is the largest chapter in the nation. GRTU and Texas Parks and Wildlife stock the Guadalupe River from December through February.  Most of the trout will average 12 to 14 inches but there are quite a few fish in the 18 to 20 inch range as well. The guadalupe River is a very popular destination this time of year so fish during the week or when the weather is nasty to avoid the crowds. 

Colorado River bass fishing. Even though bass fishing can be slow during colder weather, that doesn't usually last long in central Texas. Two or three warm day is usually enough to get the fish moving. Bass fishing this time of year can be very rewarding. The current world record Guadalupe Bass was caught by one of our clients in February. Several of  us have caught bass in the 7 to 8 pound range this time of year as well. Other possibilities this time of year are large white bass, crappie and freshwater drum. You might also have a chance to see a bald Eagle, an otter or a beaver on the Colorado.The Colorado River is never crowded, especially this time of year.

The White Bass run. Central Texas has several great rivers with late winter early spring White Bass spawning runs. Although timing the run can sometimes be tricky, it is well worth the effort when you hit it right. It can literally be a fish on every cast. This year we will be running jet boat trips for white bass on the Llano River above Lake LBJ and the Pedernales River above Lake Travis. Other rivers may be added depending on water and fishing conditions.

 

 

Early December Fishing... So many options!

Like we have been saying the last few fishing reports, here in Texas we are really lucky to have several fishing options in the Fall, and that holds true into the coming Winter months as well. Depending on the weather you can choose between trout fishing or bass, and redfish anytime. However, with the temperatures switching back and forth the way they have been, it's important to be aware of how those changes affect the bite. Understanding how the fish may react to various changes in their environment will help you decide which fish to target based on conditions and how to adjust your technique to improve your chances of getting the bite you are looking for! 

For most of us over here at All Water Guides, this is hands-down our favorite time of year to target big bass. The bass are getting ready for the winter and all sizes are feeding like crazy right now! The varying temperatures lets us fish all types of flies, from poppers and minnows to deep sinking crawfish. If it has been a little chilly over night bass may be holding in deeper holes away from the bank and will eat if the presentation is right. As it warms up the during the day they will probably move toward the banks to warm up and feed on bait fish more aggressively. Several warm days in a row can even lead to some fast action with poppers. Late Fall is setting in with a cold front that is about to hit us the first of this week. Some of us guides will probably pull out the sinking line with a small crawfish early in the day and work it slow, then switch to a floating line with a bigger crawfish when it warms up a bit and give it a bit more action. If you go out with one of our guides these are some of the techniques they will use to put you on the fish. 

Many anglers start thinking about trout this time of year, and the Guadalupe River is the number one destination for Texas trout fishing. Freshly stocked trout can be caught on a variety of attractor patterns. Stripping streamers or floating a nymph below a strike indicator are a couple of preferred methods. The Guadalupe is low and extremely clear right now so the trout spook easily and will become extremely selective as the season progresses. But, trout are being stocked weekly and overall catch rates are expected to increase as the numbers of fish in the water goes up. Light leaders and small flies will be necessary to trick the trout as they become more wary due to increased fishing pressure. As always our guides are on the water daily to stay on top of what is working to put fish in the net. 

And don't forget about the redfish! Captains Alvin Dedeaux and JT Van Zandt are the go-to guides for site casting for redfish on the Texas coast. The fishing is so hot right now that there is not much to say except you gotta try it to believe it! 

 

Changing Seasons, Changing Fishing Opportunities.

The big cool down in our weather this week reminds us that things are changing for our local fisheries... and changing fast! 

That means it's time to break out the sinking lines and weighted flies for bass fishing. Our favorite bass flies this time of year are weighted crawfish and leech patterns. And, fishing slow and deep will produce the most strikes. Some of our biggest bass are caught between now and the spring spawn! Also, timing your fishing trip can be important this time of year since bass tend to be most active right before a cold front or after several warm days. So keep your eye on the weather report before you head out!

Coastal fishing continues to be good through the fall and winter, and most people consider this to be the best time of year to catch a redfish on a fly. Cooler water temperatures and lower tides can lead to great sight casting opportunities for tailing redfish. What's more exciting than coming around a remote corner in the flats and catching site of a big ole' group of busy, blue tails?! At that moment, the possibilities seem endless...

And last, but definitely not least, late fall in Texas signals the beginning of the highly anticipated trout season. The Texas Parks and Wildlife will begin stocking our local trout stream, the Guadalupe River, starting in December. You can find the stocking schedule here. Scroll down to the Canyon Tailrace to see the schedule for the Guadalupe River. The more effective methods to catch trout on the Guadalupe tends to be nymphing or stripping streamers. Stay tuned to this page for more info on specific patterns as the season gets going. Prime time on the Guadalupe runs mid-December through March, so make sure you set the hook on a guided trip with AWG's this year before our short trout season gets away from you!  

So... time to dust off those waders and the puffy jackets and get out on the water! 

JT Van Zandt with a Colorado River Bass

Chris Koch with a nice Texas Redfish on the fly

Alvin and Grace with a Guadalupe River rainbow trout

Great Day on the Guadalupe river

Today we did a 4 boat trip on the Guadalupe River with the guys from MGC Contractors. It was cold and cloudy for most of the day, but the fishing was good so we didn't really notice. Most of the guys had never fished the Guadalupe before but everyone did a great job on the water. We caught quite a few nice rainbow trout up to 17 inches. The most productive patterns were San Juan Worms and various attractor nymphs. 

Autumn Splendor Returns to The Guadalupe River

Lately we have been splitting our trips between the Colorado and Guadalupe Rivers. Warmer weather and clearing water conditions have produced incredible bass fishing on the Colorado River, however, the leaves are starting to fall and the coldest weather of the year is headed our way. We all know trout love cold water and lousy weather, which is the forecast for the next several days on the Guadalupe River.

This week the fish started acting more like trout — eating and moving on well-presented flies — and less like lost tourist visiting the river for the first time. We caught good numbers of fish between 14 and 17 inches. Two notable catches were the huge hook jawed males that came out of the same riffle giving angler Jeff Robuck great fights and even better memories caught on camera.

As for what is working for us — it’s the usual suspects. Tandem nymph rigs using a 4X 7-1/2’ leader with a larger attractor and a small (size 20) midge tied on a 16” 5X tippet dropper under a small Thingamabobber. Top attractor patterns included eggs, stones, and pheasant tails size 12-16. Midge patterns included CT trico emergers, RS2s, and zebra midges in sizes 18-20.

Additional stocking will continue throughout the winter and the fishing will continue to improve along with our colder winter weather. Flows are low but consistent and with the recent rains the river is in excellent shape. All in all, the Guadalupe River trout season is off to its anticipated splendor.

2-10-13 Guadalupe River

Good fishing today on the Guadalupe River. We caught a bunch of nice trout on an assortment of flies. San Juan Worms and RS2s were the most productive flies.