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Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide Service in Central Texas

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Filtering by Tag: Colorado River Texas

Don't be an April Fool, Get out on the Water Soon

Spring is here in central Texas! While the weather can still be unpredictable, for the most part the cold days are behind us. Texas cold that is. As the days get longer and the temperatures start to climb into the 80s everything starts to get a lot more frisky. Especially the fish in our local waters. Fishing on the Colorado River has been good for a while. White Bass, freshwater drum, Guadalupe Bass, Largemouth Bass, and even a few Buffalo have all been caught on the Colorado in the last couple of weeks. A few folks have been lucky enough to catch some bass on top. As the water temperatures continue to rise topwater fishing will turn on more.

Because of the higher flows this winter on the Guadalupe River, trout fishing continues to be good. Fishing should continue for at least the next few weeks. Early morning half day trips will be the best bet as temperature rise. Trout fishing will start to tail off as the recreational (tubing) traffic increases. All in all this year has been one of the best seasons on the Guadalupe in years.

Coastal fishing can be pretty awesome this time of year as well. The spring is known for windy days down on the coast, but if you are flexible with your fishing days you can have an amazing time in the salt in the spring. Redfish get pretty frisky when the water starts to warm in the spring. Just keep an eye on the weather and be ready when the wind dies down.

So now that you know what’s going on out there, grab your gear and hit the water. No April fooling around here. Spring in Texas is the real deal.

It's HOT out there, so cool off on the water!

It's a scientific fact... when it's hot outside, it's always cooler on the water! And, while late summer can bring some of the hottest temperatures of the year here in Central Texas, being on the water will remind you that things are truly better outdoors. This time of year can give you a serious case of cabin fever... But, hold tight! We have a few fishing tips to help you beat the heat and help get you out of the summer doldrums. 

The first thing to do is get an early start. Early morning temps in the low-to-mid 70's will feel almost chilly compared to the near triple digit highs in the late afternoon. And, the bite has been best before the heat sets in, so plan on getting off the water by 2 or 3 PM, at the latest. Then, make sure to protect yourself from the sun with sunscreen, a hat and face buff. And, as always, don't forget to bring plenty of water in your Yeti bottles to stay well hydrated. On our guided fly fishing trips, our guides will always bring you a Yeti full of ice cold water to drink, with plenty more water in the cooler. 

On that note, we want to announce that, in support of Costa del Mar's campaign Kick Plastic, we will no longer provide drinks in plastic bottles on any of our guided trips. As many of you know, we have been working hard organizing trash cleanups on our home water, the lovely Colorado River and her tributaries. And, our First Annual Loco Trash Bash was an amazing success thanks to all of our fantastic sponsors and everyone who came out to help. Most of the trash we saw on the river was plastic water bottles! So it was an easy decision to kick plastic water bottles for Yeti bottles. We will be hosting the Second Annual Loco Trash Bash again in Spring 2019, so look for the date in the next couple of months. Meanwhile, we are working on putting together another great event for this Fall on the amazing Colorado River. Keep an eye out! No picking up trash this time... 

So, it looks like we have at several (okay, probably a lot) weeks left of this heat. If you are looking to go on a guided fishing trip here soon in Central Texas, the options are float trips on the Colorado and San Marcos Rivers, and wade trips on the Llano River. For those wanting to get salty, sight casting for redfish near Port Aransas is a great option. Check out some recent photos and videos below. 

Hang in there everybody! Fall is gonna be here before you now it. Just get out there and stay cool. You definitely don't want to be rusty for that Fall feeding frenzy! 

 

Winter is here!

 

Winter in central Texas is never a dull time of year. Monday's high can be in the 20s and it can be in the 70s by the weekend. Our fishing this time of year can be just as varied. Here are a few options for winter fishing in central Texas.

Guadalupe River trout fishing. The Guadalupe River is the southernmost trout stream in the lower 48. The Guadalupe River chapter of Trout Unlimited (GRTU) is the largest chapter in the nation. GRTU and Texas Parks and Wildlife stock the Guadalupe River from December through February.  Most of the trout will average 12 to 14 inches but there are quite a few fish in the 18 to 20 inch range as well. The guadalupe River is a very popular destination this time of year so fish during the week or when the weather is nasty to avoid the crowds. 

Colorado River bass fishing. Even though bass fishing can be slow during colder weather, that doesn't usually last long in central Texas. Two or three warm day is usually enough to get the fish moving. Bass fishing this time of year can be very rewarding. The current world record Guadalupe Bass was caught by one of our clients in February. Several of  us have caught bass in the 7 to 8 pound range this time of year as well. Other possibilities this time of year are large white bass, crappie and freshwater drum. You might also have a chance to see a bald Eagle, an otter or a beaver on the Colorado.The Colorado River is never crowded, especially this time of year.

The White Bass run. Central Texas has several great rivers with late winter early spring White Bass spawning runs. Although timing the run can sometimes be tricky, it is well worth the effort when you hit it right. It can literally be a fish on every cast. This year we will be running jet boat trips for white bass on the Llano River above Lake LBJ and the Pedernales River above Lake Travis. Other rivers may be added depending on water and fishing conditions.

 

 

Trout or Bass? We Got That

January in Texas is not like most places. One day can be in the 30s and the next day can be in the 80s. The good thing for us fishermen is that we have good fishing opportunities no matter what the weather does. 

Trout are stocked on the Guadalupe River through January and February. With the current good flows the trout season should continue well into March. Cold and cloudy or rainy days also offer a chance at some of the Guadalupe River Striped Bass. The current state fly rod record Striped Bass was caught in the Guadalupe River by John Erskine one of our guides.

Winter and early spring are one of the best times to catch some large bass on the Colorado River. Both largemouth and Guadalupe bass will be putting on weight in anticipation of the spawn. The current world record Guadalupe bass was caught on the fly in February of 2014 in the Colorado River. Largemouth bass over 5 pounds are a real possibility this time of year as well.

Fall is Here!

Fall has finally arrived in Central Texas. With the cooler weather come some of the best fishing of the year. Due to a very rainy year, most of our rivers are in better shape than they have been in along time.

Bass fishing has slowed down on most our local streams. The Colorado River is the exception. We are still picking up some nice bass by fishing deep and slow. The Colorado River fishes well all winter, the key is to fish during a warm period. Two or three warm days in a row is all it takes to get the bass in a feeding mood. The numbers of fish caught this time of year will not be as great as the warmer months, but the chance of catching some really large fish is better during this time of year. The current state record Guadalupe Bass was caught in February of 2014 by one of our clients. 

Trout fishing in the Guadalupe River is best from now through March. Unlike the bass on the Colorado, the trout fishing can be good even on the coldest days. Texas Parks and Wildlife and Guadalupe River Trout Unlimited will be stocking the river through February. Cold water flowing from the bottom of Canyon Lake dam creates the southernmost trout fishery in the United States. Like most other tailwater fisheries, strike indicator nymphing is the most productive way to fish the Guadalupe River. Most of the fish in the Guadalupe will be between 12 to 14 inch range. Fish over 20 inches and larger are caught every year.  Bundle up and get out on the water!

 

Three Rivers, Three Species of Fish, and Three Weeks of Great Fishing

Springtime is always a welcome in the Texas Hill Country — the sites, the sounds, and of course the great fishing. This spring is no different except for the rain that has started to put a dent in this horrible drought that won’t loosen her grip. With the rain have come better flows or as I like to say, “new water” which seems to awaken the fish along with the rivers. Unfortunately, sometime this “new water” takes time to clear up before the fish think about eating streamers. This cycle of good fishing, rain, muddy water, and waiting has taught us to be resourceful and patient.

That resourcefulness paid off because we were able to to incorporate three rivers and three species of fish into three weeks of awesome fishing. While the rains took the Lower Colorado River (LCR) out of commission we focused on species number one: rainbow trout on the Guadalupe River.

The Guadalupe River to fish well with good catches on midge patterns and sucker spawns. The fishing pressure is down so the fish are eating well and in great shape. On weekends we are starting to see the annual “tuber hatch” so planning a trip during the week is the way to go. And if catching trout on the fly isn’t your thing than species number two might interest you: the annual Llano River white bass run is on for the next two to three weeks.

 

So far, every trip to the Llano River has resulted in clients catching double digits of white bass on Clouser Minnows and other assorted minnow patterns. The white bass are leaving the deeper waters of the lower Llano at the mouth of the Colorado River and working their way up to the more wadeable waters upstream. After a rainy start to our March the LCR had cleared up and we were concentrating on species number three: LCR Bass—largemouth and Guadalupe bass.

 

The fishing has been really good on the LCR and we are enjoying fishing with out of town guests visiting Austin for SXSW and spring break. Though the subsurface bite has been good, we are starting to catch increasing numbers of nice bass on top. The big producer on top has been Cohen deer hair divers (www.rusuperfly.com) and assorted foam popper patterns. March and April are two of the best months for fishing the Lower Colorado. We have already caught several largemouth bass over 6 pounds and a near state record Guadalupe Bass.

Winter in Central Texas

There is no doubt what winter has come to Central Texas. When the mercury drops and the wind blows us fishermen are in serious danger from a case of cabin fever. Fortunately for us we have a some  great options this time of year to get out and catch a few fish. 

The Guadalupe river is the first spot that comes to mind this time of year. The Guadalupe River below Canyon Lake is stocked with Rainbow Trout every winter. Texas Parks and Wildlife and Guadalupe River Trout Unlimited both stock the river from November through February.  Most of the fish stocked by TPWD will be in the 8" to 12" range. GRTU stocks larger fish, sometimes up to 20" and larger. The banks of the Guadalupe River are mostly, but there are quite a few access points for wading anglers or those wanting to launch a boat. Rio Guadalupe Resort, Lazy L & L Campground and The Action Angler are a few of my favorites. The nice thing about the Guadalupe this time of year is that no matter how cold and wet it gets you can still fish. The trout are usually more active when the weather is bad and the fishing pressure will be a lot less.  Check out some recent photos below.

If you are looking for some solitude, the Colorado River is the place to be. Bass fishing on the Colorado River is a year round proposition. After a few warm mid winter days the bass will be on the move and feeding. The nice thing about winter fishing on the Colorado is the chance to catch some really big fish. The new world record Guadalupe Bass was caught in the Colorado River in February of 2014. Several Guadalupe Bass over 3 pounds have been caught so far this winter. We have caught some really nice large mouth bass as well. The trick is keeping an eye on the weather. Fishing will be best after several days in the 60s. Fishing will be slowest right after a cold front moves through the area.  While there are miles and miles of great water on the Colorado River, access is limited for paddle craft and wading anglers. The easiest place to access the Colorado River is at Little Webberville Park. Cooks Canoes rents canoes and runs a shuttle service. Some recent Colorado River photos below. 

Of course we are doing full day and half day trips all winter on both the Guadalupe and the Colorado. Drop us a line if you have any questions or if you want to book a guided trip.

It's Hunting Season

At least that's what the duck Hunters tell me as I'm backing my boat down to the water this time of year. "good luck" they say as if I'm out there to struggle through this horrible 60 degree winter day. My answer is always "we'll suffer through It". 

 

Typical trips this time of year are full day and we cover around 6- 8 miles depending on what section of the river is fishing best. This time of year you can almost count on not seeing another person all day, if that floats your boat. I will say this - when the water is low and clear and the temperatures warm up to the low 60s, there is no other place on earth I would rather be than the Colorado River. Old growth Poplar and Pecan trees line the banks creating a ribbon of reds, golds and orange.  Mr. Great Blue Heron and always impressive Osprey are always there to greet you with a fly by.

 

There is something special about fishing this river in the fall and winter. Maybe it's the size of the fish averaging around 3 lbs, or maybe it's the pure numbers once you realize you've caught over 15 by lunch time. Or is it the pleasant temperatures that require only a light fleece jacket to stay comfortable all day. In either case the splendor of the fishing can stay with you for months. We at All Water Guides would love to show you what winter "Hunting season" looks like.

 

Cool days and tight lines

It’s beginning to not feel like Christmas — and we’re okay with it!

December rang in with a flurry of freezing cold weather, which should have shut down our bass fishing. But in spite of the recent cold weather, the Colorado River fishing is still going strong.

The last few days have been some of the best this fall with clients catching good numbers of quality bass—including white bass over 2 pounds, Guadalupe bass up to 3 pounds and largemouth bass to 5 pounds! The craziest catch of the week was by angler Tyler Reisig who caught a huge (40lb.) Smallmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus bubalus) that pulled the sledsled around for about 20 minutes.

The water clarity is perfect at about 3-feet and will only get clearer throughrout the winter. Even though the temps have been colder than normal, recent warm weather has the fish turned on to chasing small minnows. Sub-surface patterns like Clouser Minnows and crawfish patterns are the most productive right now. The weather looks good for the rest of this week until the next cold front hits just before Christmas.

If you are thinking about fishing the Colorado River now is the time. And don’t forget, All Water Guide’s gift certificates make the perfect stocking stuffer!